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CAAT-A Negotiations 2012 Bargaining Update – May 9, 2012

We the North
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Improvements to staffing language: A top priority in upcoming bargaining

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The union recognizes that full-time positions are essential to quality education. Improvements to staffing language are one of the top priorities for upcoming bargaining. The union will be tabling proposals to strengthen language to create full-time positions and to prevent contracting out of faculty work.

Colleges need full-time faculty

When alumni are asked what they remember best about their college experience, most often it is a connection made with a full-time teacher in their program. It is someone who they were able to sit down and chat with, who meant a lot to their learning and provided insight into their career.

Students need full-time teachers; colleges need full-time faculty. Part-time and partial-load faculty have competence and skill to be part of the academic staff but the colleges do not hire them to deliver the full spectrum of academic services, and they are not compensated for that work. The work that goes into helping keep students on track and programs current is being done by fewer and fewer full-time teachers. This increases the burden on full time teachers and decreases the time available for program planning, curriculum development, professional development and other academic work that makes our programs outstanding.

The work of full-time faculty exists at the colleges, but the will to hire full-time faculty does not. There are more grievances in the college system over creating full-time faculty positions than any other issue. This underlines the struggle to improve fulltime faculty levels.

Where is the money going?

Colleges in 2010-11 spent less than one quarter of their budgets on full-time faculty. Increasingly, college funding dollars are directed away from the classroom: System-wide, 35-40% of tuition and grant revenue goes to college administrative overhead. The colleges have diverted funding to increased management ranks and other nonacademic activities instead of providing students with high-quality education.

Your bargaining team

Carolyn Gaunt, Cambrian College (Co-Chair)
Ted Montgomery, Seneca College (Co-Chair)
Rod Bain, Algonquin College
Gary Bonczak, Fleming College
Benoît Dupuis, La Cité collégiale
Lynn Dee Eason, Sault College
JP Hornick, George Brown College

Contact your team:
negotiations2012@gmail.com